Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

Saginaw County, Michigan

Images of America

by Roselynn Ederer

eBook

As part of the Northwest Territory, the Saginaw wilderness was not organized into a county until January 28, 1835. When Canadian, Scottish, German, and Irish pioneers began to settle along the region's many rivers, small communities developed-Burt, Birch Run, Bridgeport, Frankenmuth, Freeland, Hemlock, Merrill, St. Charles, Chesaning, Oakley, and Zilwaukee-in addition to larger towns such as Carrollton, Saginaw City, and East Saginaw. Using stories and photographs collected from life-long residents and historical societies throughout Saginaw County, this book documents the colorful lumbering, agricultural, and industrial past of these communities from the mid-1800s through the early 1900s.


Expand title description text
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

Kindle Book

  • Release date: August 20, 2003

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9781439631195
  • Release date: August 20, 2003

EPUB eBook

  • ISBN: 9781439631195
  • File size: 49769 KB
  • Release date: September 14, 2012

Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB eBook

subjects

History Nonfiction

Languages

English

As part of the Northwest Territory, the Saginaw wilderness was not organized into a county until January 28, 1835. When Canadian, Scottish, German, and Irish pioneers began to settle along the region's many rivers, small communities developed-Burt, Birch Run, Bridgeport, Frankenmuth, Freeland, Hemlock, Merrill, St. Charles, Chesaning, Oakley, and Zilwaukee-in addition to larger towns such as Carrollton, Saginaw City, and East Saginaw. Using stories and photographs collected from life-long residents and historical societies throughout Saginaw County, this book documents the colorful lumbering, agricultural, and industrial past of these communities from the mid-1800s through the early 1900s.


Expand title description text